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INTRODUCTION

Whereas, the economic transformation in Africa requires massive investment in human capital and infrastructure development, Africa’s investment has succumbed to corruption-induced illicit financial flows. Estimates by the AU and the ECA in the 2016 Report of the High Level Panel on Illicit Financial Flows from Africa1shows that, illicit financial flows in Africa over the past 50 years exceeds $1 trillion (an amount nearly matching the total ODA received by Africa over the same period).

Additionally, approximately $50 billion is lost from Africa annually through illicit financial flows instead of augmenting domestic resource mobilization (DRM) and investment. On account of corruption, the average African growth rate of 5% per year since 2000 to around 2012 remains below the 2-digit growth rate which transformed Asian economies.

Noting the grievous welfare and economic effects of corruption, the UN adopted the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC). At a regional level, AU has set in motion a number of initiatives meant to combat corruption (African Convention on Preventing and Combating Corruption (AUCPCC), AU Advisory Board on Corruption (AUBC) and the African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance (ACDEG)).

At sub-regional level, SADC introduced the SADC Protocol against Corruption in 2001 as a way of preventing, identifying, penalizing and stamping out corruption. At national level, nearly all Southern African Member States have established bodies, institutions and legislatures meant to eliminate corruption. Despite the concerted effort, corruption in Southern Africa has continued unabatedly.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

Corruption levels are of great concern amid observations that corruption causes poverty and the poor suffers more. To this end, ACT-SA has planned to carry out a number of anti-corruption interventions at the regional and national levels. In keeping with the above, the following are the strategic objectives to be achieved during theperiod 2018 to 2023:

  • To enhance the capacity of ACT-SA to continue providing quality services and to respond to emerging corruption and governance issues in Southern Africa.
  • To enhance the capacities of specialised anti-corruption bodies, auditors and audit institutions, judicial institutions, and law enforcement agents, to effectively respond to the challenge of corruption
  • To support national, regional and international efforts towards the formulation, implementation, adherence and coordination of anti-corruption treaties, legislation, policies and action plans
  • To enhance the capacities of communities, media and civil society organisations to effectively contribute to dialogue on strengthening the development and implementation of anti-corruption institutions, legislation and policies for eradication of poverty and inequality
  • To contribute to anti-corruption knowledge generation, codification and advocacy for improved efficiency, effectiveness and impact of anti-corruption efforts
  • To improve access to justice to victims of corruption, targeting marginalised communities, especially women, youths, the disabled and those living with HIV and AIDS
  • To strengthen national, regional and international cooperation on criminal, civil and administrative matters relating to corruption in line with regional, continental and international anti-corruption treaties

In pursuit of the strategic objectives, the following activities will be undertaken:

ACTIVITIES

(A) Anti-Corruption Capacity Enhancement / Institution building

  • Responsible Department: International Programmes Department
  • Responsible Officer: Regional Programme Manager: Anti-Corruption Capacity Building/ Institution Building
  • Oversight: Regional Director with assistance from Trustees responsible for Anti-Corruption Capacity Building/ Institution Building
  • The intended purpose: To enhance the capacities of specialised anti-corruption bodies, auditors and audit institutions, judicial institutions, and law enforcement agents, to effectively respond to the challenge of corruption.

Ref Activities
1. Carrying out a knowledge / capacity gap assessment targeting specialised anti-corruption bodies, audit institutions, judicial institutions, and law enforcement agents, on their effectiveness respond to the challenge of corruption
2. Collaborating with higher education institutions to offer examinable anti-corruption programmes
3. Anti-corruption training for national audit institutions
4. Anti-corruption training for anti-corruption bodies
5. Anti-corruption training for judicial institutions
6. Anti-corruption training for law enforcement agents
7. Anti-corruption training for electoral management bodies

(B) Anti-corruption institutional, policy and law reform:

  • Responsible Department: Legal Services Department
  • Responsible Officer:Regional Programme Manager: Legal Services
  • Oversight: Regional Director with assistance from Trustee responsible for Legal Services
  • The intended purpose: To support national, regional and international efforts towards the formulation, implementation, adherence and coordination of anti-corruption treaties, legislation, policies and action plans


Ref Activities
1. Assessment and report on existing anti-corruption institutions, legislation and policies in SADC Member States
2. Convening and facilitating a Regional Anti-Corruption Conference or Indaba to share good practices on anti-corruption institutions, legislation, policies and legal precedents
3. Technical support to governments and other stakeholders to coordinate, formulate and implement national anti-corruption action plans
4. Lobbying for the setting up of special Commissions to deal with economic crimes such as corruption, asset stripping and odious debts
5. Advocacy for the revival of the SADC Tribunal, whose renewed mandate should include handling Corruption Cases
6. Collaborating with like minded organisations in Southern Africa to engage their Parliaments and other stakeholders to come up with comprehensive anti-corruption legislation
7. Engaging parliamentarians, JSCs, Ministries of Justice and other stakeholders to consider the setting up of specialized anti-corruption courts
8. Giving technical support to SMEs, CSOs and other stakeholders to formulate, endorse and enforce internal anti-corruption policies

C) Access to Justice for Victims of Corruption

  • Responsible Department: Legal Services Department
  • Responsible Officer: Regional Programme Manager: Access to Justice
  • Oversight: Regional Director with support from Trustees responsible for Legal Services
  • The intended purpose: To improve access to justice to victims of corruption, targeting marginalised communities, especially women, youths, the disabled and those living with HIV and AIDS

Ref Activities
1. Developing a case work policy for the organisation
2. Giving anti-corruption advice and referral services to victims, and whistle-blowers
3. Monitoring and reporting on court proceedings
4. Public interest litigation intending to set judicial precedents

(D) Community, civil society and business sector empowerment

  • Department: Education Department
  • Responsible Officer: Regional Programme Manager: Anti-Corruption Capacity Building/ Institution Building
  • Oversight: Regional Director with support from Trustees responsible for Anti-Corruption Capacity Building/ Institution Building
  • The intended purpose: To enhance the capacities of communities, media and civil society organisations to effectively contribute to dialogue on strengthening the development and implementation of anti-corruption institutions, legislation and policiesfor eradication of poverty and inequality

Ref Activities
1. Conducting community anti-corruption trainings to empower communities to contribute to policy dialogue on strengthening anti-corruption institutions, laws and policies and to desist from corruption activities
2. Conducting training of traditional leaders on anti-corruption
3. Conducting anti-corruption trainings for the media
4. Strengthening a regional network of the youth against corruption
5. Training the youth and Setting up volunteer schools’ anti-corruption clubs
6. Training SMEs against corruption

(E) National, Regional and International cooperation on civil, criminal and administrative matters relating to corruption

  • Responsible Department: Legal Services
  • Oversight: Regional Director with support from Trustees responsible for Legal Services
  • Responsible Officer: Trustee responsible for Legal Services International Liaison Officer
  • The intended purpose: To strengthen national, regional and international cooperation on criminal, civil and administrative matters relating to corruption in line with regional, continental and international anti-corruption treaties.

Ref Activities
1. Strengthening networks for national, regional and international cooperation
2. Documenting, reporting and dissemination of anti-corruption good practices relating to international cooperation on matters relating to corruption
3. Conducting trainings seeking to strengthen state and non-state actors on national, regional international cooperation on matters relating to corruption
4. Identifying stolen assets and facilitating the recovery thereof
5. Providing legal and other services to state and non-state actors on related matters

(F) Research, monitoring, evaluation, learning and information

  • Responsible Department: Research and Development Department
  • Responsible Officer: Regional Programme Manager: Research & Development
  • Oversight: Regional Director with support from Trustee responsible for Research and Development
  • The intended purpose: To contribute to anti-corruption knowledge generation, codification and advocacy for improved efficiency, effectiveness and impact of anti-corruption efforts

Ref Activities
1. Conducting an assessment of the nature and extent of corruption and institutional capabilities and responses to curb it in selected SADC Member States
2. Conducting UNCAC CSO Review for Zimbabwe, Namibia, South Africa, Botswana and Tanzania in collaboration with other anti-corruption CSOs
3. Undertaking research on illicit financial flows in key sectors such as the mining sector
4. Monitoring, reporting and advocacy on the signing, ratification and domestication of major anti-corruption instruments or treaties by SADC Member States
5. Documenting high profile corruption cases, and advocacy against impunity
6. Simplifying and disseminating important anti-corruption treaties, policies and legislation
7. Producing and disseminating annual state of corruption reports
8. Conducting sector specific researches on corruption, such as in the mining, health, education, sectors etc.
9. Conducting service delivery surveys targeting sectors of interest

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

The following are the expected outcomes at the end of the programming cycle:

  • By the end of 2018, a gender balanced and multi-skilled Board of Trustees of the ACT-SA functional and providing quality services and effectively responding to emerging corruption and related issues improved.
  • By the end of 2018, and every year thereafter, until 2023, the organisation assisting at least 100 victims of corruption, to access justice at least 3 public interest cases taken to court thereby setting precedents.
  • By the end of 2019, the capacities of specialised anti-corruption bodies, auditors and audit institutions, judicial institutions, and law enforcement agents, enhanced to effectively respond to the challenge of corruption.
  • By 2023, most of the SADC Member States having formulated, implemented, adhered to and coordinated of anti-corruption treaties, laws, policies and action plans.
  • By 2022, anti-corruption institutions, legislation and policies strengthened to eradicate poverty and inequality affecting marginalised communities.
  • By 2023 large bodies of anti-corruption knowledge generated, codified and publicly available for use by different stakeholders.
  • By end of 2021, functional networks to strengthen national, regional and international cooperation on criminal, civil and administrative matters relating to corruption in line with regional, continental and international anti-corruption treaties in place and functional.

Resources Mobilisation Strategies

To support the implementation of this Plan, please contact the Chairperson and Director of ACT-SA through e-mails boardchair@anticorruptiontrust.orgor director@anticorruptiontrust.org

ACT-SA is embarking on the following strategies to execute its mandate in the most effective, efficient and sustainable manner

  1. Relationship with individual donors: ACT-SA will sensitize individual donors on its priorities and seeking collaboration and support.
  2. Basket Fund: Different donors will be approached to contribute to a basket fund that will be channeled towards the implementation of this Strategy.
  3. Administration of grants CSOs: It is the intention of ACT-SA to administer anti-corruption grants to CSOs in Southern Africa who will be responsible for implementing activities in countries were the organisation has no offices but has Board members in place.
  4. Use of the volunteerism modality: The modality is an important resource that will continue to be harnessed in pursuit of the priorities of the organisation. For instance, ACT-SA shall approach organisations such as UNV, VSO and other administers of experts to field their staff towards the implementation of the plan.
  5. The use of volunteers is an important modality towards organisational and development effectiveness.
  6. Students’ research: ACT-SA research efforts will be advanced through sponsoring students interested in undertaking researches that advances the interests of ACT-SA.